Hearing set for what to do with dogs owned by Iowa dog breeder

Southern Iowa dog breeder Daniel Gingerich wants to give up the animals in his possession,…

Southern Iowa dog breeder Daniel Gingerich wants to give up the animals in his possession, but where they will go is still to be determined.Gingerich amassed 120 violations of the Animal Welfare Act since March, according to USDA records. USDA investigators visited his Seymour, Iowa, facilities 18 times total.KCCI has been following the story for weeks.In a Monday morning telephone hearing in the federal civil court case filed by the DOJ against him, a federal judge set another hearing for where the dogs will go.The time and date for that hearing have yet to be determined.According to federal court records, Gingerich wants to give up the 189 remaining dogs in his possession to an Indiana-based rescue called “The Love Pet Project.”In a letter, Dr. Denise Katz, the leader of the group, says a team of groomers, veterinarians, veterinarian technicians/ assistants and kennel staff are all able to move the dogs from Gingerich’s property to their location in Indiana for “assessment, management, medical inspection and distribution to different homes for permanent placement or other agencies coordinating the placement.”Katz told KCCI Friday evening that she has a team of 15 groomers, five veterinarians, a cardiologist and more who are ready to come to Seymour to step in. Katz says her group specializes in helping animals in situations like this.But, the Department of Justice does not want that move to happen. Instead, court records show the DOJ wants the dogs to be released from Gingerich’s care, but to go to the Animal Rescue League of Iowa. ARL is already in possession and giving care to 30 of Gingerich’s animals that were in “acute distress,” court records show. Further, the DOJ says it is unsure of how Gingerich came up with the number of 189 remaining dogs in his possession. Court records show inventories provided by Gingerich to the USDA show he has 263 dogs at his property in Seymour, Iowa and more than 200 other dogs at other sites, including some sites that are unlicensed.”There are far more than 189 dogs at issue here,” DOJ stated in a motion.More discrepancies arose in Monday’s telephone hearing, including how well Gingerich was taking care of puppies and dogs who needed veterinary care.Judge Stephanie M. Rose stated there is no dispute that dogs are breeding, dying without getting the care ordered by the court, and the court still doesn’t have vet records it ordered.”All of his actions are of the contrary,” she said of the court’s order.Further, court records show Joe Miller, the man managing Gingerich’s Seymour property had resigned and Gingerich was now there from Ohio taking care of the dogs.”I cannot support Daniel’s practices and behavior,” Miller stated in his resignation letter. While a date and time has not been set for the hearing of where the dogs will go, Judge Rose stated the court had “significant issues with his presence last time.” She stated Gingerich was driven to the federal courthouse in Des Moines by a driver who appeared to be intoxicated, urinated on the street, threw trash out on the property and fought with security. While Gingerich does not need to be present during the next hearing, his counsel and counsel for the DOJ will be. KCCI has called Gingerich multiple times and left multiple messages for a request to comment, he has not returned the phone calls.

Southern Iowa dog breeder Daniel Gingerich wants to give up the animals in his possession, but where they will go is still to be determined.

Gingerich amassed 120 violations of the Animal Welfare Act since March, according to USDA records. USDA investigators visited his Seymour, Iowa, facilities 18 times total.

KCCI has been following the story for weeks.

In a Monday morning telephone hearing in the federal civil court case filed by the DOJ against him, a federal judge set another hearing for where the dogs will go.

The time and date for that hearing have yet to be determined.

According to federal court records, Gingerich wants to give up the 189 remaining dogs in his possession to an Indiana-based rescue called “The Love Pet Project.”

In a letter, Dr. Denise Katz, the leader of the group, says a team of groomers, veterinarians, veterinarian technicians/ assistants and kennel staff are all able to move the dogs from Gingerich’s property to their location in Indiana for “assessment, management, medical inspection and distribution to different homes for permanent placement or other agencies coordinating the placement.”

Katz told KCCI Friday evening that she has a team of 15 groomers, five veterinarians, a cardiologist and more who are ready to come to Seymour to step in. Katz says her group specializes in helping animals in situations like this.

But, the Department of Justice does not want that move to happen. Instead, court records show the DOJ wants the dogs to be released from Gingerich’s care, but to go to the Animal Rescue League of Iowa.

ARL is already in possession and giving care to 30 of Gingerich’s animals that were in “acute distress,” court records show.

Further, the DOJ says it is unsure of how Gingerich came up with the number of 189 remaining dogs in his possession. Court records show inventories provided by Gingerich to the USDA show he has 263 dogs at his property in Seymour, Iowa and more than 200 other dogs at other sites, including some sites that are unlicensed.

“There are far more than 189 dogs at issue here,” DOJ stated in a motion.

More discrepancies arose in Monday’s telephone hearing, including how well Gingerich was taking care of puppies and dogs who needed veterinary care.

Judge Stephanie M. Rose stated there is no dispute that dogs are breeding, dying without getting the care ordered by the court, and the court still doesn’t have vet records it ordered.

“All of his actions are of the contrary,” she said of the court’s order.

Further, court records show Joe Miller, the man managing Gingerich’s Seymour property had resigned and Gingerich was now there from Ohio taking care of the dogs.

“I cannot support Daniel’s practices and behavior,” Miller stated in his resignation letter.

While a date and time has not been set for the hearing of where the dogs will go, Judge Rose stated the court had “significant issues with his presence last time.” She stated Gingerich was driven to the federal courthouse in Des Moines by a driver who appeared to be intoxicated, urinated on the street, threw trash out on the property and fought with security. While Gingerich does not need to be present during the next hearing, his counsel and counsel for the DOJ will be.

KCCI has called Gingerich multiple times and left multiple messages for a request to comment, he has not returned the phone calls.