Here’s How to Build Your Own Cat Trees, Catwalks, and Cat Furniture

Table of Contents BedsMerging human and cat design To make sure the perch is secure,…

To make sure the perch is secure, you’ll want to drill it into studs. “You don’t want to use drywall hangers because even if the walk will hold a cat, if they’re jumping, the forces multiply,” Cohen says. “So drill into those studs, and then the sky is the limit.”

Regardless of how you organize the walks and shelves, Van de Kieft says, “You just want to make sure there is not a dead-end.” This is especially important in a multi-cat home so no pet feels cornered or trapped. She also encourages you to make sure the contraptions are big enough to accommodate your cat in a sleeping position. “Cats do like it cozy, so not too big either,” she says.

The Grove cat tower from Tuft + Paw features a slatted design made out of premium plywood with ash veneer.

Photo: Tuft + Paw

Beds

Though cats tend to like to be higher up, you still may want to have a bed for them in your home. “Beds are really great projects,” Garred says. “Cats love all sorts of tactile and cozy materials.”

This is a prime opportunity for owners to be really creative with the design. Any material for the bed is pretty fair game, though it might be helpful to choose something that’s machine-washable.

“You could take it in so many directions,” Garred says. Whether it is a wooden base with a plush topper or a bean bag-esque poof, there are countless ways to build the perfect resting spot for your pet. Garred notes, however, that cats tend to like more concave shapes. Cats enjoy “something they can put their backs up against, where they feel contained inside,” Garred says.

Another impressive Cat Haus creation.

Photo: Cat Haus

Merging human and cat design

When catifying your home, the ultimate goal should be to create a space that both you and your pet enjoy. “The key is to think about how you can integrate your cat’s life into your own life,” Garred says. If you have an established color palette, design something that fits that scheme. The same would go for the style of your furniture and decor. Design your cat’s furniture to be midcentury, Art Deco, Scandinavian, boho, or whatever style you love.

Lombardi insists that it can help to think of it as your cat’s room. “This is their place in your home,” she says. “Make [their decor] a statement instead of something you want to hide or push in the corner.”