Kentucky animal shelter is overrun with dozens of displaced pets after deadly tornadoes

An animal shelter in Kentucky is overwhelmed after deadly tornadoes devastated the state, leaving dozens…

An animal shelter in Kentucky is overwhelmed after deadly tornadoes devastated the state, leaving dozens of pets scared and without a home. 

Speaking to DailyMail.com, David Spalding, Board President of the Mayfield-Graves County Animal Shelter, described how the shelter was lucky enough to remain standing, but now is tasked with taking in and transporting dozens of animals. 

‘Today we’re moving a little over 100 animals to other rescue organizations just to make room,’ Spalding said. ‘We’ve never been through a situation like this. From what I’m told from the people who have been through disasters like this is that after about three or four days to expect a large influx.

‘Cats, dogs, right now the animals are scared, especially the ones that have completely lost their home. That was their comfort zone.’

DailyMail.com got a first look at the displaced animals being held in crates as they hope for their owners’ return.  Volunteers and workers were seen preparing dogs and cats for a big move out of the Kentucky shelter as it expects to be inundated with rescues the remainder of the week. 

The animals are being outfitted with microchips and taken by the Humane Society of Kentucky to Massachusetts and other states where there’s more space for them.

In Kentucky alone, the human death toll is at 80, with Governor Andy Beshear saying, ‘That number is going to exceed 100. This is the deadliest tornado we have ever had.’

The Mayfield-Graves County Animal Shelter in Kentucky remained standing throughout the storm, but workers are now taking in up to 100 injured animals and displaced pets

DailyMail.com got a first look at the displaced animals being held in crates as they hope for their owners' return

DailyMail.com got a first look at the displaced animals being held in crates as they hope for their owners’ return

Volunteers and workers were seen preparing dogs and cats for their big move out of the Kentucky shelter as it prepares to be inundated with rescues the remainder of the week

Volunteers and workers were seen preparing dogs and cats for their big move out of the Kentucky shelter as it prepares to be inundated with rescues the remainder of the week

Speaking to DailyMail.com, David Spalding, Board President of the Mayfield County Animal Shelter, 'Today we're moving a little over 100 animals to other rescue organizations just to make room'

Speaking to DailyMail.com, David Spalding, Board President of the Mayfield County Animal Shelter, ‘Today we’re moving a little over 100 animals to other rescue organizations just to make room’

'Cats, dogs, right now the animals are scared, especially the ones that have completely lost their home. That was their comfort zone,' Spalding said, adding that he expects many more rescues in the coming days

‘Cats, dogs, right now the animals are scared, especially the ones that have completely lost their home. That was their comfort zone,’ Spalding said, adding that he expects many more rescues in the coming days

The animals are being outfitted with microchips and taken by the Humane Society of Kentucky to Massachusetts and other states where there is currently more space for them

The animals are being outfitted with microchips and taken by the Humane Society of Kentucky to Massachusetts and other states where there is currently more space for them

'Right now we're working with Kentucky Humane Society and other organizations to help remove the animals that we've already had here and take to other rescue organizations so we can take in other animals, the hurt and the injured, that have been affected during the storm,' Spalding said

‘Right now we’re working with Kentucky Humane Society and other organizations to help remove the animals that we’ve already had here and take to other rescue organizations so we can take in other animals, the hurt and the injured, that have been affected during the storm,’ Spalding said

Spalding added that they expect to see far more animals rescued in the coming days. 'The animals don't have a place to go back to so it may take a while for them to calm down and come out where they're visible and we can actually catch them and bring them in,' he said

Spalding added that they expect to see far more animals rescued in the coming days. ‘The animals don’t have a place to go back to so it may take a while for them to calm down and come out where they’re visible and we can actually catch them and bring them in,’ he said 

At least 94 people are confirmed dead across six states following ‘one of the largest’ storm outbreaks in history after tornadoes devastated the Midwest and South. 

It’s believed at least 30 tornadoes ripped through Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee with rescue efforts for both animals and humans underway.   

‘Friday night we had massive destruction from an unprecedented tornado,’ Spalding said. ‘It happened to go right through the center of our town. 

‘Right now we’re working with Kentucky Humane Society and other organizations to help remove the animals that we’ve already had here and take to other rescue organizations so we can take in other animals, the hurt and the injured, that have been affected during the storm,’ he said. ‘Most of them are large animals because they’re easier for people to see. The smaller pets we’re just starting to see today because people are a little more focused on what’s going on.’

Spalding added that they expect to see far more animals rescued in the coming days. 

‘The animals don’t have a place to go back to so it may take a while for them to calm down and come out where they’re visible and we can actually catch them and bring them in,’ he said. 

Spalding said they will be adding microchips to animals so if in the future their owner returns, they can properly keep track and identify them for a reunion. 

‘We figure that some of these folks may be displaced for one or two weeks,’ he said. 

‘I haven’t been sleeping much,’ Spalding added. ‘I’m overwhelmed, yes, but manageable.’ 

Spalding said they will be adding microchips to animals so if in the future their owner returns, they can properly keep track and identify them to reunite the pet and their owners

Spalding said they will be adding microchips to animals so if in the future their owner returns, they can properly keep track and identify them to reunite the pet and their owners

Kat Rooks, Initiatives Director at the Kentucky Humane Center was in one of three vans that left Louisville to pick up 27 dogs and eight cats from the Mayfield Center

 Kat Rooks, Initiatives Director at the Kentucky Humane Center was in one of three vans that left Louisville to pick up 27 dogs and eight cats from the Mayfield Center

'This is going to be a long, long recovery there,' Rooks told told Courier News Monday night after unloading animals

‘This is going to be a long, long recovery there,’ Rooks told told Courier News Monday night after unloading animals

'There were a lot of tears on Saturday,' Rooks added. 'These are my friends, people that I know, I work with closely. People that I know lost everything there'

‘There were a lot of tears on Saturday,’ Rooks added. ‘These are my friends, people that I know, I work with closely. People that I know lost everything there’

'Animals are coming in surrendered by good Samaritans. Animals coming in as strays. [Workers] are going out and assisting search-and-rescue teams and helping to remove animals from properties that have been devastated. They are already seeing an influx and expect that to continue,' Rooks said

‘Animals are coming in surrendered by good Samaritans. Animals coming in as strays. [Workers] are going out and assisting search-and-rescue teams and helping to remove animals from properties that have been devastated. They are already seeing an influx and expect that to continue,’ Rooks said 

At least 448 National Guard members are assisting with rescue and recovery efforts and FEMA is already on the ground helping displaced families

At least 448 National Guard members are assisting with rescue and recovery efforts and FEMA is already on the ground helping displaced families

'We figure that some of these folks may be displaced for one or two weeks,' Spalding said. 'I haven't been sleeping much,' Spalding added. 'I'm overwhelmed, yes, but manageable'

‘We figure that some of these folks may be displaced for one or two weeks,’ Spalding said. ‘I haven’t been sleeping much,’ Spalding added. ‘I’m overwhelmed, yes, but manageable’

Kat Rooks, Initiatives Director at the Kentucky Humane Center, was in one of three vans that left Louisville to pick up 27 dogs and eight cats from the Mayfield shelter. 

‘This is going to be a long, long recovery there,’ Rooks told told the Courier Journal Monday night after unloading animals. ‘Animals are coming in surrendered by good Samaritans. Animals coming in as strays. [Workers] are going out and assisting search-and-rescue teams and helping to remove animals from properties that have been devastated. They are already seeing an influx and expect that to continue.’

‘There were a lot of tears on Saturday,’ she added. ‘These are my friends, people that I know, I work with closely. People that I know lost everything there.’ 

Governor Beshear said at least 109 people remain unaccounted for. 

At least 448 National Guard members are assisting with rescue and recovery efforts and FEMA is already on the ground helping displaced families. 

‘I believe this is the most rapid response from the federal government in the history of the United States of America and we need it and we are really grateful for it,’ Beshear said.

He added that Kentucky continues to rally together and help each other during the tragedy: ‘This is one state, people that love one another.’ 

The governor also ordered flags be flown to at half-staff until next Monday in remembrance of the lives lost and asked other states to follow suit. 

CANDLE FACTORY, MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY: Recovery crews work at the Mayfield Consumer Products candle factory where 110 were working when the tornado struck. Only 40 of the workers were rescued alive

CANDLE FACTORY, MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY: Recovery crews work at the Mayfield Consumer Products candle factory where 110 were working when the tornado struck. Only 40 of the workers were rescued alive

CANDLE FACTORY, MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY: Search are rescue crews work at the Mayfield Consumer Products candle factory Sunday morning. Rescuers describe crawling over the bodies of the dead to reach survivors

KENTUCKY: Tornado damage in Bowling Green, Kentucky. More than 80 people are dead in the state following the tornado outbreak throughout the Midwest and South this weekend

KENTUCKY: Tornado damage in Bowling Green, Kentucky. More than 80 people are dead in the state following the tornado outbreak throughout the Midwest and South this weekend

KENTUCKY: Pete Desai, left, who owns the Cardinal Motel in Bowling Green, Kentucky looks through the wreckage caused by the tornado

KENTUCKY: Pete Desai, left, who owns the Cardinal Motel in Bowling Green, Kentucky looks through the wreckage caused by the tornado. Biden has called it ‘one of the largest’ storm outbreaks in history

‘I’m really sorry,’ an emotional Beshear said during a press briefing Monday morning, addressing those still searching for their loved ones. 

‘You’re not supposed to lose people like this, and to not know and not have the information has got to make it that much harder.’ 

While noting the toll from the deadly storm was lower than he initially feared, Beshear said he expects the toll to increase as searchers continue to sift through the rubble. 

He noted that the numbers will continue to fluctuate as officials search and ‘it may be weeks before we have counts on both deaths and levels of destruction.’

‘Sometimes they have, thank god, gone down, other times they’ve gone up,’ he said, adding that ‘undoubtedly, there will be more’ fatalities.